Archive for the ‘Aerospace’ Category

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

Posted by Editor On December - 12 - 2017

The future of healthcare, aerospace, and automotives brought to life in Pasadena

By Gregory van Zuyen

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

The Additive Manufacturing Americas 2017 Conference brought a lot of talent and innovation to the Pasadena Convention Center on Dec.6-8

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

Moderator Chris Young takes a question from the audience during the Dec. 7 panel discussion on aerospace. Seated from left to right: Dr. Steven Schmid of the National Science Foundation, Dr. Raymond “Corky” Clinton of NASA, Dr. Youping Gao with Aerojet Rocketdyne, Gregory Hilbert with Dassault Falcon Jet, followed by Young.

The Additive Manufacturing Americas Conference held Dec. 6-8 in Pasadena was a stellar opportunity to meet a host of dignitaries and a display of new inventive technologies. Hosted at the Pasadena Conference Center, the conference offered three days of talks and exhibitions centered on the industries of healthcare, aerospace, and automotives. The talks were revelatory and provided key insights in how these industries will be changing in the future.

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

Gregory Hilbert of Dassault Falcon Jet describes additive manufacturing on a massive scale to compete in the military jet market with China

Speakers included Daniel Hale Williams Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Surgery for Northwestern University, Dr. Guillermo Ameer, Mayo Clinic’s Professor of Plastic Surgery Dr. Samir Mardini, the Edward R. Clark Chair of Advanced Manufacturing for the Dept. of Industrial Engineering for the University of Louisville Dr. Kevin Chou, Program Director for Manufacturing Machines and Equipment for the National Science Foundation Dr. Steven R. Schmid, Associate Director for the Technical Science and Technology Office of NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center Dr. Raymond “Corky” Clinton, Aerojet Rocketdyne’s Technical Fellow and Discipline Chief Dr. Youping Gao, Dassault Falcon Jet’s Gregory Hilbert, Co-Founder of Hack Rod Felix Holst, Stratasys Senior Applications Engineer Chas Sullivan, BRCHN Design House Founder Sam Birchenough, Scott Martin from Boeing, GE Healthcare’s Bill Whitford, and Jordan Noone of Relativity; all leaders of industry and research.

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

Sam Birchenough of BRCHN Design House speaking at the Additive Manufacturing Americas Conference on the use of Autodesk Fusion 360’s sculptural and parabolic qualities for the use in designing ergonomic equipment

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

A highlight of the show was hearing Felix Holst of HackRod discuss how they were using VR, AI, and additive manufacturing to produce a lightweight yet incredibly durable chassis for their car called La Bandita

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

The LUMEX System using both selective metal sintering and CNC finishing in a layer-by-layer process to produce high-precision metal tooling

LUMEX Systems
Technologies revealed at the event included the LUMEX System by Matsuura USA. LUMEX uses both CNC and powder bed fusion – selective laser melting additive manufacturing functions together in the same machine, comfortably creating a print bed space operating at a warm 50c. The result is a finished metal product with the capacity for finished deep pockets and cavities like water cooling systems and heat venting. In some cases, no post production because the hybrid metal 3D printers finish the print with a CNC process every ten layers. The Avance-60 is their biggest machine with a 600 X 600 X 500mm build space and retails for approximately $1.6m.

Worldwide, Matsuura has sold 40 plus of the Avance-60 and Avance-25 models, four in the U.S. including two to the University of Nebraska where researchers are working with exciting new metal powder formations. Matsuura is also particularly proud of introducing the LUMEX System to Gillette. Tom Houle, Director for Matsuura USA, showed us the math for another customer application. Because of a ten-second savings on an 18-second production cycle, the superiority of the LUMEX System additive manufacturing technology is saving Gillette upwards of $5,000,000 annually. “That guy is going to get a raise for buying this machine,” smiled Houle.

Houle was also proud of the service centers and distributors of the LUMEX System across the U.S. ready to promptly respond to client requests. He is looking forward to being at the AMUG Conference in St. Louis and at RAPID in Fort Worth next year for those interested in seeing the machines in operation and examining samples. They can be found at http://www.masuurausa.com.

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

ACEO has been able to achieve the hitherto impossible with the 3D printing of silicone, samples of which are shown here

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

The ACEO team members present at the Additive Manufacturing Americas 2017 event are from left to right: Judith Distalrath, Johanna Judas, and Dr. Florian Liesener

ACEO

Another key discovery unveiled in the Americas event was the 3D printing of silicone. Not silicone-like. Silicone, pure and made simple by ACEO, the 3D printing brand division of Germany’s 103-year-old chemical company Wacker Chemie AG.

A hitherto impossible feat (silicone prints like toothpaste), ACEO has formulated a method via super-secret water-soluable support material that makes the most complex of silicone prints as easy as CAD.

“We have the most amazing team, all brought together by being really good at what we do. That is why we are able to do this,” said Dr. Florian Liesener, materials engineer for ACEO. He described how all members of ACEO have used their diverse expertise to produce the software and engineering in combination with the material to make this break-through in additive manufacturing. “It was unbelievable to see it happen; it was like being in a movie.”

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

Narine Tigranyan of Junction3D displays the unique operating system of the Solus 3D printer

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

The resolution and detail maintained by the Solus — at the micro scale — had to be seen to be believed

SOLUS

Solus is a new way of looking at DLP, no doubt about it. In a system already establishing a base in Latin America, the Solus 3D printer uses convention overhead projection systems as the light-source for the layer-by-layer scripting of the print. A solution to difficult to repair light systems, the Solus goes a step further. It has unbelievable resolution. The booth display for Solus, sponsored by Junction 3D, had step-by-step samples of the same model descending in size, with the smallest of their prints, the size of a pencil lead, had all the detail of the original. The Solus produced truly remarkable results, worthy of attention. See more at Junction3D.com.

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

An example of what a full-size WASP 3D printer can do

WASP
Loren Boburg, industrial designer for Impresión3D, is doing research and development of additive manufacturing for low-income housing in Guatemala. As far as difficult terrains and environmental dangers go (read volcanos), Guatemala presents the impossible. Also, there’s the spotty electrical component, adding one more problem to implementing this great idea that would bring low cost structures with maximum safety to thousands of people. So Ms. Boburg was in Pasadena primarily to interface with a company uniquely qualified to provide Guatemala with an answer. Enter WASP.

World’s Advanced Saving Project (WASP) makes large-scale 3D printers, on the magnitude of being able to print furniture. They have also revolutionized architectural additive manufacturing techniques, capable of 3D printing cement with 1.5 kilowatts of power. With a business consciousness devoted to helping the planet through all manners of environmental concern, WASP is proving to be a welcome member of the 3D printing community.

WASP was not the only large-scale 3D printer on display at the Additive Manufacturing Americas event. 3D Platform was there with the 3DP Workbench featuring a meter by meter by meter build-envelope, and the Titan from was also on display.

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

The Additive Manufacturing Americas 2017 Conference included on site display of Titan Robotics by Chemson

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

Dan McFarlane of 3D Platforms demonstrates the versatility of the 3DP Workbench

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

Brent Reisender of Choice Technical Services, a licensed MarkForged distributor

Service bureaus such as Choice Technical Services (CTS) and Hawk Ridge Systems were in attendance demonstrating MarkForged and 3DEO was on hand to provide low-cost metal 3D printing options.

Raise3D, a San Diego-based 3D printer, presented a new development by their software engineers to allow a stop-start feature for 3D printing. Marc Franz of Raise3D was so delighted that at the end of the day when the convention center had to shut down power, his 3D printer was ready to resume the previous night’s print the next morning as soon as power was restored. They will have more to say at CES.

Stratasys, a principal supporter of the Additive Manufacturing event was on hand to promote the successful use of the J750. Their 3D printer received praise from a number of panelists, whose challenging use of the technology impressed attendees. One of these attendees, Merrick Campbell, an engineer for Tanner Research in Monrovia, Calif., commented, “I came away from the show with a few things that were useful.”

Early Bird Registration for Inside 3D Printing Ends This Week

Sign up today for this must-see SoCal event

The deadline to save with early bird prices to Inside 3D Printing San Diego, Dec. 4-5 is this Friday, Oct. 20 Registrants can save up to $400 on on-site prices of the show’s seminars and attendee events. Registration to visit the expo show itself is free, but must be done in advance.

The 2016 Inside 3D Printing Show was a stellar event, and a must for 3D printrs in the greater Southern California area. Companies ranging in notoriety in every vertical will be there to provide new developments to consumers and retailers alike and NASA will be on deck with a rocket nozzle demonstration.

Seminar topics include the “The Future of 3D Printing” keynote address featuring Terry Wohlers of Wohlers Associates; “Agility in Motion: Advantaged 3D Printing Innovation;” “A Road Map to 1 Million Unique Bio-Mechanically Enhanced Products;” “Getting Started with 3D Printing in Orthopaedic Surgery;” “Build with Life—Living Structures from 3D Bioprinters” and many more.

Sign up today at http://inside3dprinting.com/san-diego/2017/register/.

The Daily 3D Detail: WESTEC 2017

Posted by Editor On September - 12 - 2017

Westec 2017

Just one of the fun things to see at WESTEC 2017

WESTEC 2017 opens today at the Los Angeles Convention Center (1201 South Figueroa Street, Los Angeles) with a wide assortment of booths and vendors all promoting the latest in industrial design. Billed as the west coast’s largest manufacturing trade show, WESTEC provides everyone from aerospace to robotics a chance to showcase their latest developments and innovations. A host of speakers will also be on hand for the three-day event to provide much-anticipated seminar sessions for attendees.

In addition to the keynote speeches by IBM and TITAN America MFG, there will be panel discussions on additive manufacturing and smart manufacturing. A smart manufacturing hub will be on display for businesses to tour, and a machining academy has been set up to help polish skills.

It’s Not Too Late to Register
Attendees can still register for free access to the WESTEC 2017 expo floor through a promo code available thanks to Polymer Molding on their Facebook page.

The Daily 3D Detail: Here come wearable electronics

Posted by Editor On September - 8 - 2017

Here come wearable electronics

Wearable electronics will soon be available for a variety of industries. Photo by Wyss Institute.

A new 3D printing method developed by researchers at Harvard University has made wearable electronic technology a reality. These “soft electronic devices of nearly every size and shape” can be custom-designed and impregnated in 3D-bioskins.

The recent article in the journal Advanced Materials called “Hybrid 3D Printing of Soft Electronics” available at the Wiley Online Library explains the nuances of this discovery, and how we’ll be able to get one step closer to being cyborgs.

Here come wearable electronics

Everything from fashion to healthcare will be affected. Photo by Wyss Institute.

Through the use of 3D-printed conductive and dielectric elastomeric materials (think plastic skins with internal flexible electronics) and the ability to implant chips and transmitters into the print, the capacity to produce a wearable cellphone or key fob is within grasp.

The wearable electronics are a part of the Wyss Institute of Biologically Inspired Engineering‘s plan to bring this technology to a variety of industries, including healthcare and aerospace, where the need for unobtrusive biosensory transmitters on high-risk individuals such as fighter pilots and astronauts can provide ground crews with more reliable and effective data.

Here come wearable electronics

The key to the process is robotic placement of micro-chips in flexible, skin-like thermoplastic polyurethane. Photo by Wyss Institute.

The research team, led by Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) Professor Jennifer Lewis and the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory’s J. Daniel Berrigan, developed the system of 3D printing thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and silver electronic inks with placement of miniaturized chips and LEDs through the use of a robotic vacuum nozzle.

For more on this story see 3DPrintingIndustry.com.

The Daily 3D Detail: NASA goes green in space

Posted by Editor On September - 4 - 2017

NASA goes green in space

NASA announced plans to put Tethers Unlimited’s Refabricator into space next year. Photo courtesy of NASA/MSFC/Emmett Given.

NASA has announced plans to launch in 2018 the Refabricator, a large recycling and remanufacturing machine intended to shred plastics and metals into reusable material and then use the material to 3D-print new objects — all of this done within the same device.

The Refabricator project is the responsibility of Tethers Unlimited, a space tech firm based in Seattle, Washington Tethers Unlimited received $750,000 in award money from NASA to fund the program. Plans are now in place to have the Refabricator installed into the International Space Station (ISS) by next year.

The Refaabricator project is similar in function to other recycling innovations being sought around the world. 3Devo, from The Netherlands, is one such country pursuing recycling plastics with their SHR3D IT system for shredding and granulating plastics for reuse. The Precious Plastics project, the brainchild of Dave Hakkens, is another such foray into creating localized recycling systems for plastics. Precious Plastics is also being conducted as an open-source operation with free downloads of equipment plans and installation instructions.

Rob Hoyt, CEO of Tethers, commented on the Refabricator project for NASA by saying, “The Refabricator demonstration is a key advance toward our vision of implementing a truly sustainable, in-space manufacturing ecosystem. Astronauts could use this technology to manufacture and recycle food-safe utensils, and turn what is now inconvenient waste into feedstock to help build the next generation of space systems.”

For more on this story, see the article at 3DPrintingIndustry.com.

The Daily 3D Detail: JPL searching for 3D printing interns

Posted by Editor On August - 30 - 2017

JPL searching for 3D printing interns

Opportunities now exist to be a part of JPL’s manufacturing team

Jet Propulsion Laboratories, located in Altadena, California, near Pasadena, is on the lookout for students interested in robotics and space exploration.

The posting on the job website Indeed.com is soliciting applications for work in their Mechanical Systems Engineering, Fabrication and Test Division. Duties include working with a team to develop mechanisms and mechanical systems; building prototypes to prove out mechanism design concepts; running tests to help inform design decisions; and analyzing test data to ensure that the team finds the most important results.

Applicants must be currently enrolled in full-time courses in a college or university pursuing a bachelors, masters, or PhD in mechanical engineering, aerospace engineering, chemistry, civil engineering, material/science, physics, robotics, structural engineering, operations research, or related technical discipline. Applicants must also have a 3.0 grade average to be considered.

Visit Indeed.com for instructions on applying.

The Daily 3D Detail: Condos on Mars

Posted by Editor On August - 29 - 2017

Condos on Mars

Artist vision of Mars habitat. Photo courtesy of dezeen.com.

Someday we’ll be living in space. At the rate of current of testing, Branch Technology and Foster + Partners may very well be the developer of your moon unit housing or Mars condo.

Condos on Mars

Members of Branch Technology’s NASA 3D Printed Habitat Challenge team

NASA’s efforts to produce sustainable housing off planet has concluded its competitive testing of third-party submissions. The top award of $250,000 was given to the combined efforts of the two research and development teams of Branch Technology, located in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Foster + Partners of California, for their efforts in producing a 3D-printed habitat. This challenge is the culmination of three levels of challenges in the Phase Two stage of NASA’s attempts to create “advance construction technology needed to create sustainable housing solutions for Earth and beyond.”

Condos on Mars

Competition for NASA’s 3D Printed Habitat Challenge was held at Caterpillar’s Edwards Demonstration and Learning Center in Peoria, Illinois

Referred to as NASA’s 3D Printed Habitat Challenge, the competition has elicited the efforts of five separate teams attempting to best each other in the ever-increasingly more difficult requests. Cash prizes have been given out to the top three contenders in each level of each phase. In the three levels of Phase Two, Branch Technology and Foster + Partners were in the top three of each event. They garnered top prize in level one, a challenge of printing a cone and a cylinder subject to endurance testing; third prize in level two involving the 3D-printing of a support beam (top prize went to South Korea’s Team Moon X); and now the top prize in 3D-printing a dome structure holding 3,726 pounds of ultimate load.

These challenges have brought space structures closer to a viable reality, admits NASA’s Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Technology Mission Directorate Jim Reuter. “The advancement and innovation in additive construction that we’ve seen from these teams is inspiring,” said Reuter. “Meeting the technology goals of this challenge proves that competition can push boundaries, and their work puts us that much closer to preparing the way for deep space exploration.”

Branch Technology and Foster + Partners also credited Techmer Polymer Modifiers for their work in material support.

For more on this story, see these articles at 3DPrint.com and 3DPrintingIndustry.com.

The Daily 3D Detail: Urine in Space

Posted by Editor On August - 25 - 2017

Researchers provide possibility of printing 3D objects by harvesting astronaut urine

Urine in space may be used to create 3D printing inks

Researchers from the Blenner Research Group of South Carolina’s Clemson University have introduced a novel way of creating 3D printing ink in space from human urine. The discovery, a process of harvesting yeast bacteria that feed on the urea present in human urine, may be the answer for providing raw materials for use in constructing objects in space.

Coast Guard sees 3D printing as necessity

Bear Grylls understands the value of urine in unforgiving environments

The Blenner Research Group presented their results today at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS). ACS, the world’s largest scientific society, featured nearly 9,400 presentations this week in Washington, D.C. on a wide range of science topics. Of these presentations, the prospect of harvesting construction material from urine garnered worldwide attention.

“If astronauts are going to make journeys that span several years, we’ll need to find a way to reuse and recycle everything they bring with them,” says Mark A. Blenner, assistant chemical and biomolecular engineering professor at Clemson University.

Urine in space may be used to create 3D printing inks

The process requires gene splitting and the use of the yeast called Yarrowia lipolytica. By employing CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) technology to the yeast DNA, the researchers believe they will be able to convert the hydrogen and carbon molecules, which result as fatty acids and are seen as beginning molecular building blocks, into constructible material. The research, funded by NASA’s Space Tech Research Grants, is looking at editing the DNA so that the yeast are able to produce polyester globules instead of the fatty acids.

For more details on this development, please see these links at 3DPrintingIndustry.com and CBC.ca.

The Daily 3D Detail: 3D printing in space now on grand scale

Posted by Editor On August - 12 - 2017

3D printing in space now on grand scale

The Made in Space team working on Archinaut

Made in Space, the NASA approved company responsible for printing tools aboard the International Space Station, has been able to prove printing in space is possible on a grand scale by 3D printing a beam structure 30 meters in length in a vacuum chamber under zero gravity.

The unprecedented achievement means NASA and other space programs can begin planning large-scale production in the unforgiving circumstances of the space environment. In fact, it is proving to be a simpler task than 3D printing under the conditions of the environment and gravity on Earth.

When printing in zero gravity, for instance, support structures are not needed to prevent the collapse of overhangs beyond the usual 45 degree angle commonly accounted for in normal 3D printing operations. Also, the vacuum conditions of space are ideal for the 3D printing of some metals, which would otherwise be an expensive operation.

The experiments were conducted by using a thermal vacuum chamber (TVAC) at NASA Ames Research Center’s Engineering Evaluation Laboratory (EEL). To accomplish the task, Made in Space created an Extended Structure Additive Manufacturing Machine (ESAMM) to simulate the conditions of space.

According to Andrew Rush, Made in Space President & CEO, “These successful demonstrations mean that on-demand, adaptable manufacturing of complex structures in space has been significantly derisked.”

More tests are ensuing as Made in Space develops their large scale in-space assembly module called Archinaut. For more information regarding this story, see the article published by 3DPrintingIndustry.com.

The Daily 3D Detail: Additive manufacturing and space agriculture

Posted by Franka Schoening On August - 12 - 2017

As we all know, 3D printing has increasingly gained importance in space exploration due to its versatility and adaptability. To facilitate a permanently staffed space station by 2022, the Chinese have started exploring options to improve astronauts diet. Nutrition is crucial to functioning in a highly demanding environment like a space station.

Astronauts farming in micro-gravity environment

With the help of 3D printed plant boxes, Jing Haipeng and Chen Dong cultivated lettuce in the micro-gravity environment. The 30-days spent on board were considered a huge success, and likely to inspire major agricultural opportunities for future long-term space exploration.

Growing lettuce in 3D printed flower boxes in space

Before anyone can taste the space-grown lettuce, bio-testing is necessary to ensure safety for human consumption. Bon Appetit, Chewbacca! Read more here at 3ders.org.