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Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

Posted by Editor On December - 12 - 2017

The future of healthcare, aerospace, and automotives brought to life in Pasadena

By Gregory van Zuyen

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

The Additive Manufacturing Americas 2017 Conference brought a lot of talent and innovation to the Pasadena Convention Center on Dec.6-8

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

Moderator Chris Young takes a question from the audience during the Dec. 7 panel discussion on aerospace. Seated from left to right: Dr. Steven Schmid of the National Science Foundation, Dr. Raymond “Corky” Clinton of NASA, Dr. Youping Gao with Aerojet Rocketdyne, Gregory Hilbert with Dassault Falcon Jet, followed by Young.

The Additive Manufacturing Americas Conference held Dec. 6-8 in Pasadena was a stellar opportunity to meet a host of dignitaries and a display of new inventive technologies. Hosted at the Pasadena Conference Center, the conference offered three days of talks and exhibitions centered on the industries of healthcare, aerospace, and automotives. The talks were revelatory and provided key insights in how these industries will be changing in the future.

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

Gregory Hilbert of Dassault Falcon Jet describes additive manufacturing on a massive scale to compete in the military jet market with China

Speakers included Daniel Hale Williams Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Surgery for Northwestern University, Dr. Guillermo Ameer, Mayo Clinic’s Professor of Plastic Surgery Dr. Samir Mardini, the Edward R. Clark Chair of Advanced Manufacturing for the Dept. of Industrial Engineering for the University of Louisville Dr. Kevin Chou, Program Director for Manufacturing Machines and Equipment for the National Science Foundation Dr. Steven R. Schmid, Associate Director for the Technical Science and Technology Office of NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center Dr. Raymond “Corky” Clinton, Aerojet Rocketdyne’s Technical Fellow and Discipline Chief Dr. Youping Gao, Dassault Falcon Jet’s Gregory Hilbert, Co-Founder of Hack Rod Felix Holst, Stratasys Senior Applications Engineer Chas Sullivan, BRCHN Design House Founder Sam Birchenough, Scott Martin from Boeing, GE Healthcare’s Bill Whitford, and Jordan Noone of Relativity; all leaders of industry and research.

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

Sam Birchenough of BRCHN Design House speaking at the Additive Manufacturing Americas Conference on the use of Autodesk Fusion 360’s sculptural and parabolic qualities for the use in designing ergonomic equipment

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

A highlight of the show was hearing Felix Holst of HackRod discuss how they were using VR, AI, and additive manufacturing to produce a lightweight yet incredibly durable chassis for their car called La Bandita

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

The LUMEX System using both selective metal sintering and CNC finishing in a layer-by-layer process to produce high-precision metal tooling

LUMEX Systems
Technologies revealed at the event included the LUMEX System by Matsuura USA. LUMEX uses both CNC and powder bed fusion – selective laser melting additive manufacturing functions together in the same machine, comfortably creating a print bed space operating at a warm 50c. The result is a finished metal product with the capacity for finished deep pockets and cavities like water cooling systems and heat venting. In some cases, no post production because the hybrid metal 3D printers finish the print with a CNC process every ten layers. The Avance-60 is their biggest machine with a 600 X 600 X 500mm build space and retails for approximately $1.6m.

Worldwide, Matsuura has sold 40 plus of the Avance-60 and Avance-25 models, four in the U.S. including two to the University of Nebraska where researchers are working with exciting new metal powder formations. Matsuura is also particularly proud of introducing the LUMEX System to Gillette. Tom Houle, Director for Matsuura USA, showed us the math for another customer application. Because of a ten-second savings on an 18-second production cycle, the superiority of the LUMEX System additive manufacturing technology is saving Gillette upwards of $5,000,000 annually. “That guy is going to get a raise for buying this machine,” smiled Houle.

Houle was also proud of the service centers and distributors of the LUMEX System across the U.S. ready to promptly respond to client requests. He is looking forward to being at the AMUG Conference in St. Louis and at RAPID in Fort Worth next year for those interested in seeing the machines in operation and examining samples. They can be found at http://www.masuurausa.com.

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

ACEO has been able to achieve the hitherto impossible with the 3D printing of silicone, samples of which are shown here

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

The ACEO team members present at the Additive Manufacturing Americas 2017 event are from left to right: Judith Distalrath, Johanna Judas, and Dr. Florian Liesener

ACEO

Another key discovery unveiled in the Americas event was the 3D printing of silicone. Not silicone-like. Silicone, pure and made simple by ACEO, the 3D printing brand division of Germany’s 103-year-old chemical company Wacker Chemie AG.

A hitherto impossible feat (silicone prints like toothpaste), ACEO has formulated a method via super-secret water-soluable support material that makes the most complex of silicone prints as easy as CAD.

“We have the most amazing team, all brought together by being really good at what we do. That is why we are able to do this,” said Dr. Florian Liesener, materials engineer for ACEO. He described how all members of ACEO have used their diverse expertise to produce the software and engineering in combination with the material to make this break-through in additive manufacturing. “It was unbelievable to see it happen; it was like being in a movie.”

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

Narine Tigranyan of Junction3D displays the unique operating system of the Solus 3D printer

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

The resolution and detail maintained by the Solus — at the micro scale — had to be seen to be believed

SOLUS

Solus is a new way of looking at DLP, no doubt about it. In a system already establishing a base in Latin America, the Solus 3D printer uses convention overhead projection systems as the light-source for the layer-by-layer scripting of the print. A solution to difficult to repair light systems, the Solus goes a step further. It has unbelievable resolution. The booth display for Solus, sponsored by Junction 3D, had step-by-step samples of the same model descending in size, with the smallest of their prints, the size of a pencil lead, had all the detail of the original. The Solus produced truly remarkable results, worthy of attention. See more at Junction3D.com.

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

An example of what a full-size WASP 3D printer can do

WASP
Loren Boburg, industrial designer for Impresión3D, is doing research and development of additive manufacturing for low-income housing in Guatemala. As far as difficult terrains and environmental dangers go (read volcanos), Guatemala presents the impossible. Also, there’s the spotty electrical component, adding one more problem to implementing this great idea that would bring low cost structures with maximum safety to thousands of people. So Ms. Boburg was in Pasadena primarily to interface with a company uniquely qualified to provide Guatemala with an answer. Enter WASP.

World’s Advanced Saving Project (WASP) makes large-scale 3D printers, on the magnitude of being able to print furniture. They have also revolutionized architectural additive manufacturing techniques, capable of 3D printing cement with 1.5 kilowatts of power. With a business consciousness devoted to helping the planet through all manners of environmental concern, WASP is proving to be a welcome member of the 3D printing community.

WASP was not the only large-scale 3D printer on display at the Additive Manufacturing Americas event. 3D Platform was there with the 3DP Workbench featuring a meter by meter by meter build-envelope, and the Titan from was also on display.

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

The Additive Manufacturing Americas 2017 Conference included on site display of Titan Robotics by Chemson

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

Dan McFarlane of 3D Platforms demonstrates the versatility of the 3DP Workbench

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

Brent Reisender of Choice Technical Services, a licensed MarkForged distributor

Service bureaus such as Choice Technical Services (CTS) and Hawk Ridge Systems were in attendance demonstrating MarkForged and 3DEO was on hand to provide low-cost metal 3D printing options.

Raise3D, a San Diego-based 3D printer, presented a new development by their software engineers to allow a stop-start feature for 3D printing. Marc Franz of Raise3D was so delighted that at the end of the day when the convention center had to shut down power, his 3D printer was ready to resume the previous night’s print the next morning as soon as power was restored. They will have more to say at CES.

Stratasys, a principal supporter of the Additive Manufacturing event was on hand to promote the successful use of the J750. Their 3D printer received praise from a number of panelists, whose challenging use of the technology impressed attendees. One of these attendees, Merrick Campbell, an engineer for Tanner Research in Monrovia, Calif., commented, “I came away from the show with a few things that were useful.”