Archive for the ‘Designers’ Category

Rome uses WASP 3D printers for Opera House sets

Armed with five DeltaWASP 3MT 3D printers, theater designers created their set design for Rome’s famous Teatro dell’Opera.

Rome uses WASP 3D printers for Opera House sets

World’s Advanced Saving Project (WASP) 3D printers are large scale machines with a cubic meter build envelope first mentioned by our publication in July of last year regarding 3D printing classes held in Milan. Now the large-scale printers are in the news for producing 223 components for the set design of the theater’s upcoming performance of Fra Diavolo. The components, created by Corsetti and Massimo Troncanetti, were then installed upon the two-story wooden trestle support frames to produce a stunning display of art and design.

For more on this story, see Sarah Anderson Goehrke’s story at 3DPrint.com.

Combining Metamaterial Design with Multimaterials

As we reported on July 28, metamaterial design provides innovative solutions of functional movement to otherwise solid constructs in 3D printing.

According to a recent study published in MIT News, researchers investigating the properties of multimaterial 3D prints have been able to determine specific property capacities available within tiny cube structures utilizing materials combined by the printing process.

Thanks to MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), which is supported in part by the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency’s (DARPA) SIMPLEX program, researchers have been able to use algorithmic calculations to determine design schematics involving the properties of the materials used and their likely result in terms of flexibility and endurance.

The algorithmic-generated designs are gauged for stress tolerances using Young’s Modulus and Poisson’s Ratio for uniaxial tension. The diagram below displays a variety of structural designs and the results of their tests.

Combining Metamaterial Cesign with Multimaterials

Examples of multimaterial patterns possible through optomization. Image via Zhu, Skouras, Chen & Matusik

CSAIL’s Bo Zhu, the primary author of the study, commented in the article, “Conventionally, people design 3-D prints manually. But when you want to have some higher-level goal — for example, you want to design a chair with maximum stiffness or design some functional soft [robotic] gripper — then intuition or experience is maybe not enough. Topology optimization, which is the focus of our paper, incorporates the physics and simulation in the design loop. The problem for current topology optimization is that there is a gap between the hardware capabilities and the software. Our algorithm fills that gap.”

For more information on the study, see this article at 3DPrintingIndustry.com

The Daily 3D Detail: Structure Synth create incredible 3D objects

Posted by Taila Rodrigues On August - 6 - 2017
Structure Synth complexy

Even if you who have never coded before, and even if you are terrible at math, you are able to use this tool and generate surprising and complex 3D structures.

Structure Synth is an open-source, multiplatform system for manipulating 3D structures.

Instead of using the mouse to position objects and modify structures, you position them with command lines written in the EisenScript code.

EisenScript is a programming language designed by Mikael Hvidtfeldt, pure mathematics, basic and simple.

Commands

EisenScript codes

This system has a full set of features that allow you to create generative 3D scenes. There are a lot of commands operators to explore, but with just a few commands you can quickly and easily generate 3D artwork that looks impossible or almost impossible.

The generated files can be saved in .obj format compatible with 3D slicer software and can then be printed in 3D.

The system is completely free, available for Mac, Windows and Linux – download here.

To read the full content and learn more about Structure Synth visit their website.

The Daily 3D Detail: Safecracking robot showcased at DEF CON

Posted by Editor On August - 1 - 2017

Safecracking Robot Showcased at DEF CON

Thousands of engineers, IT professionals, and self-proclaimed hackers descended on Las Vegas from July 27-30 for the world’s largest series of cybersecurity conferences known as the Black Hat Conference and DEF CON. One of the talks at the conference received world-wide attention for its dazzling display of tech-savvy engineering by utilizing 3D-printed parts and a studied application of tumbler design to show off a homemade robot that was able to crack a safe in half an hour.

Safecracking Robot Showcased at DEF CON

The robot is the design of Nathan Seidle, owner of Boulder, Colorado-based SparkFun, purveyor of DIY electronic goods such as Arduinos and Raspberry PIs. The story first appeared in Wired magazine.

Safecracking Robot Showcased at DEF CON

The robot challenge began with a gift of SentrySafe brand fireproof safe to Seidle from his wife, who purchased it cheaply as the original owner had lost the combination. Over the past few months, Seidle and his team of designers, Rob Reynolds and Joel Bartlett, spent $200 on various parts to build a robot whose capacity to examine micron-level differences in tumbler notches was able to reduce the million potential combinations (100x100x100) into a third of the possible options. This then gave the robot a greatly reduced amount of time needed to brute-force the remaining options and open the safe within a time frame of 90 minutes.

At the DEF CON show, Seidle and his team purchased a brand new safe from SentrySafe and set their robot to work. Cracking the safe within 30 minutes brought gasps and cheers from the conference audience, providing a stunning display of how the designing of 3D-printed parts and clever robotics continue to challenge the complex world of cybersecurity.

For more articles on the story, See 3DPrintingIndustry.com and 3DPrint.com. For a tutorial on how to build your own safecracking robot, visit this page at Sparkfun.