Archive for the ‘Designers’ Category

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

Posted by Editor On December - 12 - 2017

The future of healthcare, aerospace, and automotives brought to life in Pasadena

By Gregory van Zuyen

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

The Additive Manufacturing Americas 2017 Conference brought a lot of talent and innovation to the Pasadena Convention Center on Dec.6-8

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

Moderator Chris Young takes a question from the audience during the Dec. 7 panel discussion on aerospace. Seated from left to right: Dr. Steven Schmid of the National Science Foundation, Dr. Raymond “Corky” Clinton of NASA, Dr. Youping Gao with Aerojet Rocketdyne, Gregory Hilbert with Dassault Falcon Jet, followed by Young.

The Additive Manufacturing Americas Conference held Dec. 6-8 in Pasadena was a stellar opportunity to meet a host of dignitaries and a display of new inventive technologies. Hosted at the Pasadena Conference Center, the conference offered three days of talks and exhibitions centered on the industries of healthcare, aerospace, and automotives. The talks were revelatory and provided key insights in how these industries will be changing in the future.

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

Gregory Hilbert of Dassault Falcon Jet describes additive manufacturing on a massive scale to compete in the military jet market with China

Speakers included Daniel Hale Williams Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Surgery for Northwestern University, Dr. Guillermo Ameer, Mayo Clinic’s Professor of Plastic Surgery Dr. Samir Mardini, the Edward R. Clark Chair of Advanced Manufacturing for the Dept. of Industrial Engineering for the University of Louisville Dr. Kevin Chou, Program Director for Manufacturing Machines and Equipment for the National Science Foundation Dr. Steven R. Schmid, Associate Director for the Technical Science and Technology Office of NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center Dr. Raymond “Corky” Clinton, Aerojet Rocketdyne’s Technical Fellow and Discipline Chief Dr. Youping Gao, Dassault Falcon Jet’s Gregory Hilbert, Co-Founder of Hack Rod Felix Holst, Stratasys Senior Applications Engineer Chas Sullivan, BRCHN Design House Founder Sam Birchenough, Scott Martin from Boeing, GE Healthcare’s Bill Whitford, and Jordan Noone of Relativity; all leaders of industry and research.

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

Sam Birchenough of BRCHN Design House speaking at the Additive Manufacturing Americas Conference on the use of Autodesk Fusion 360’s sculptural and parabolic qualities for the use in designing ergonomic equipment

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

A highlight of the show was hearing Felix Holst of HackRod discuss how they were using VR, AI, and additive manufacturing to produce a lightweight yet incredibly durable chassis for their car called La Bandita

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

The LUMEX System using both selective metal sintering and CNC finishing in a layer-by-layer process to produce high-precision metal tooling

LUMEX Systems
Technologies revealed at the event included the LUMEX System by Matsuura USA. LUMEX uses both CNC and powder bed fusion – selective laser melting additive manufacturing functions together in the same machine, comfortably creating a print bed space operating at a warm 50c. The result is a finished metal product with the capacity for finished deep pockets and cavities like water cooling systems and heat venting. In some cases, no post production because the hybrid metal 3D printers finish the print with a CNC process every ten layers. The Avance-60 is their biggest machine with a 600 X 600 X 500mm build space and retails for approximately $1.6m.

Worldwide, Matsuura has sold 40 plus of the Avance-60 and Avance-25 models, four in the U.S. including two to the University of Nebraska where researchers are working with exciting new metal powder formations. Matsuura is also particularly proud of introducing the LUMEX System to Gillette. Tom Houle, Director for Matsuura USA, showed us the math for another customer application. Because of a ten-second savings on an 18-second production cycle, the superiority of the LUMEX System additive manufacturing technology is saving Gillette upwards of $5,000,000 annually. “That guy is going to get a raise for buying this machine,” smiled Houle.

Houle was also proud of the service centers and distributors of the LUMEX System across the U.S. ready to promptly respond to client requests. He is looking forward to being at the AMUG Conference in St. Louis and at RAPID in Fort Worth next year for those interested in seeing the machines in operation and examining samples. They can be found at http://www.masuurausa.com.

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

ACEO has been able to achieve the hitherto impossible with the 3D printing of silicone, samples of which are shown here

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

The ACEO team members present at the Additive Manufacturing Americas 2017 event are from left to right: Judith Distalrath, Johanna Judas, and Dr. Florian Liesener

ACEO

Another key discovery unveiled in the Americas event was the 3D printing of silicone. Not silicone-like. Silicone, pure and made simple by ACEO, the 3D printing brand division of Germany’s 103-year-old chemical company Wacker Chemie AG.

A hitherto impossible feat (silicone prints like toothpaste), ACEO has formulated a method via super-secret water-soluable support material that makes the most complex of silicone prints as easy as CAD.

“We have the most amazing team, all brought together by being really good at what we do. That is why we are able to do this,” said Dr. Florian Liesener, materials engineer for ACEO. He described how all members of ACEO have used their diverse expertise to produce the software and engineering in combination with the material to make this break-through in additive manufacturing. “It was unbelievable to see it happen; it was like being in a movie.”

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

Narine Tigranyan of Junction3D displays the unique operating system of the Solus 3D printer

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

The resolution and detail maintained by the Solus — at the micro scale — had to be seen to be believed

SOLUS

Solus is a new way of looking at DLP, no doubt about it. In a system already establishing a base in Latin America, the Solus 3D printer uses convention overhead projection systems as the light-source for the layer-by-layer scripting of the print. A solution to difficult to repair light systems, the Solus goes a step further. It has unbelievable resolution. The booth display for Solus, sponsored by Junction 3D, had step-by-step samples of the same model descending in size, with the smallest of their prints, the size of a pencil lead, had all the detail of the original. The Solus produced truly remarkable results, worthy of attention. See more at Junction3D.com.

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

An example of what a full-size WASP 3D printer can do

WASP
Loren Boburg, industrial designer for Impresión3D, is doing research and development of additive manufacturing for low-income housing in Guatemala. As far as difficult terrains and environmental dangers go (read volcanos), Guatemala presents the impossible. Also, there’s the spotty electrical component, adding one more problem to implementing this great idea that would bring low cost structures with maximum safety to thousands of people. So Ms. Boburg was in Pasadena primarily to interface with a company uniquely qualified to provide Guatemala with an answer. Enter WASP.

World’s Advanced Saving Project (WASP) makes large-scale 3D printers, on the magnitude of being able to print furniture. They have also revolutionized architectural additive manufacturing techniques, capable of 3D printing cement with 1.5 kilowatts of power. With a business consciousness devoted to helping the planet through all manners of environmental concern, WASP is proving to be a welcome member of the 3D printing community.

WASP was not the only large-scale 3D printer on display at the Additive Manufacturing Americas event. 3D Platform was there with the 3DP Workbench featuring a meter by meter by meter build-envelope, and the Titan from was also on display.

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

The Additive Manufacturing Americas 2017 Conference included on site display of Titan Robotics by Chemson

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

Dan McFarlane of 3D Platforms demonstrates the versatility of the 3DP Workbench

Additive Manufacturing Americas Event Report

Brent Reisender of Choice Technical Services, a licensed MarkForged distributor

Service bureaus such as Choice Technical Services (CTS) and Hawk Ridge Systems were in attendance demonstrating MarkForged and 3DEO was on hand to provide low-cost metal 3D printing options.

Raise3D, a San Diego-based 3D printer, presented a new development by their software engineers to allow a stop-start feature for 3D printing. Marc Franz of Raise3D was so delighted that at the end of the day when the convention center had to shut down power, his 3D printer was ready to resume the previous night’s print the next morning as soon as power was restored. They will have more to say at CES.

Stratasys, a principal supporter of the Additive Manufacturing event was on hand to promote the successful use of the J750. Their 3D printer received praise from a number of panelists, whose challenging use of the technology impressed attendees. One of these attendees, Merrick Campbell, an engineer for Tanner Research in Monrovia, Calif., commented, “I came away from the show with a few things that were useful.”

The Daily 3D Detail: Indian Company Divide By Zero Awarded

Posted by Editor On October - 17 - 2017

Indian market leaders Divide By Zero win at the 3D Printing World Awards

Video interview with Neeti Sansare, co-founder of Divide by Zero Technologies & Snigdha Agarwal, rising fashion designer and stylist discussing India’s first 3D-printed dress design created by Divide By Zero Technologies

Divide By Zero, a Navi Mumbai-based 3D printer manufacturing company founded by Swapnil Sansare and Neeti Sansare, are showing the world how India does 3D printing. Divide By Zero has been actively supplying both global and local enterprises with a whole range of industrial grade 3D printers. Apart from this, the Indian 3D printing experts are also the pioneers of the patented Advanced Fusion Plastic Modeling (AFPM™) technology which delivers Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) grade output strength at prices lower than FDM 3D printing. The AFPM technology is already incorporated the Aion 500 & Aion 500 MK2 3D printers manufactured by the company.

In the spirit of the Make in India initiative, Divide By Zero is the first Indian 3D printer manufacturing company to export machines across the Indian borders to countries such as Malaysia, Sweden, and Dubai. Divide By Zero has collaborated with multiple big names in the field of automotive research and development, such as Tata-Ficosa, SMR–Motherson, Mahle-Behr, Magneti Marelli, Advik Hi-tech, Prettl Automotive among many others. Apart from providing 3D printing technology, Divide By Zero goes one step further and also provides training options to the buyers as well as strong post-purchase support.

For its commitment towards the automotive sector, Divide By Zero was awarded the prestigious 3D Printing World Award 2017 for being the 3D Printer Manufacturer of the year 2017, thereby recognising their excellence and contribution in the Automobile and Engineering and Tool Design. The award commended the AION 500 industrial-grade 3D printer’s forte in increasing assembly line efficiency and overall cost reduction in automotive engineering.

The award is presented by Trinity Media & Marketing Solutions, the company behind 3D Printing World Expo, 3D Printing World Think Board, 3D Printing World TV, 3D Printing World News Express, 3D Printing World Awards and 3D Printing World School.

Apart from the 3D Printing World Award 2017, earlier this year Divide By Zero’s AION 500 MK2 was awarded the prestigious I Mark award in the ‘Industrial Equipment Category’ at India Design Mark 2017—an award instituted by the India Design Council in cooperation with the Japan Institute of Design Promotion.

As India’s leading industrial-grade 3D printing manufacturers, Divide By Zero regularly shares useful 3D printing and additive manufacturing tips, tutorials, and other interesting editorial. To visit Divide By Zero’s website and access free whitepapers, go to http://www.divbyz.com.

Early Bird Registration for Inside 3D Printing Ends This Week

Sign up today for this must-see SoCal event

The deadline to save with early bird prices to Inside 3D Printing San Diego, Dec. 4-5 is this Friday, Oct. 20 Registrants can save up to $400 on on-site prices of the show’s seminars and attendee events. Registration to visit the expo show itself is free, but must be done in advance.

The 2016 Inside 3D Printing Show was a stellar event, and a must for 3D printrs in the greater Southern California area. Companies ranging in notoriety in every vertical will be there to provide new developments to consumers and retailers alike and NASA will be on deck with a rocket nozzle demonstration.

Seminar topics include the “The Future of 3D Printing” keynote address featuring Terry Wohlers of Wohlers Associates; “Agility in Motion: Advantaged 3D Printing Innovation;” “A Road Map to 1 Million Unique Bio-Mechanically Enhanced Products;” “Getting Started with 3D Printing in Orthopaedic Surgery;” “Build with Life—Living Structures from 3D Bioprinters” and many more.

Sign up today at http://inside3dprinting.com/san-diego/2017/register/.

Converge 2017 Event Report

Posted by Editor On September - 23 - 2017

Altair’s award presentation and gallery celebrates the nexus of technology + design

By Gregory van Zuyen

Converge 2017 Event Report

Christine Outram of Veritas Prep speaking at Converge 2017 on five trends to watch

We will start with the name of the guy you want to know most. His name is Chad Zamler. Why? Becaue he’s the guy that will give you a pass to Converge 2018. If you are lucky, he may still get you passes to Converge 2017 in other cities.

Converge? What’s that? you ask. Why, it’s the only thing in the world more brain-blowing, more creativeley inspiring, more idea-intoxicating than TED talks on steroids. It all happened here at the Skirball Center in Los Angeles on Sept. 13. If you were anywhere close to Southern California that day, it was the place to be.

Converge 2017 Event Report

Stuart Fingerhut of The Visionary Group photographs the Airbus Lightrider, a 3D-printed electric motorcycle displayed at Converge 2017

The accomplishments and innovations of the people that spoke at Converge is astounding. Through the Converge award program — presented by Altair‘s entertaining CMO Jeff Brennan — we are introduced to the thinkers and artists that give us license to think more imaginatively and more expansively than we thought possible. These are the brilliant and inspired genii of our generation, worthy of world respect.

Converge 2017 awarded nine people for their contributions to the nexus of design and technology. The awards do not go lightly. The value of thought that the award winners provide our planet are so worthy of contribution, the very small 3D-printed statuette they receive is all that more precious a symbol of meaning. How ever much the cinematic world considers the Oscar, that’s how much more the techno-design world will consider the award of the Converge Chair of Accomplishment.

Converge 2017 Event Report

Tim Prestero’s Firefly incubators for third-world countries has saved babies’ lives already

The Converge 2017 presentation began with Tim Prestero of Design That Matters. It’s hard to condense the feels of his talk into a paragrpah, because he dealt with the construction of infant incubators for third-world countries. He went blow-by-blow through the process he had to go to through to design and create a device that would drastically reduce the greatest cause of infant mortality; lack of warmth combined with the common onset of jaundice.

Prestero explained his search for a solution that solved all the issues coming from doctors, nurses, patients, hospital administrators and repair personnel. His years-long odyssey resulted in the Firefly, a portable basinet that provided life-saving UV rays from both above and below the baby. It’s not an exaggeration to say that this man is personnally responsible for the preservation of thousands of lives.

It gets better from there. Christina Outram of Veritas Prep brought unimaginable insight into the future with her analysis of trends to watch; the tracking of recycled electronics, the death of websites through speech-driven apps, customizing the user experience for keener levels of market share, and more. Again, you wish you were there.

When it comes to industrial design, few hold the authority of Tim Morton. The contribution he and Newell Brands have done for Rubbermaid alone earns him a lifetime achievement award. In his talk he introduced concepts like “plaid,” a mixing of the verticals and horizontals of an industry for conceptualizing better product design.

Architect Doris Sung of DOSU Studio Architecture was next, speaking about her development of smart materials for an application to architecture. A professor at University of Southern California, Sung turned an academic investigaton into bimetal composition into a solution into autonomously heating and cooling buildings through the natural process of turning otherwise flat, combined pieces of metal into a curled, ventilating, basketweaved surface by the action of solar heat.

Columbia University Professor of Engineering and Data Science Hod Lipson came on stage next and blew our minds with self-learning robots that seek the rewards of self-duplicating. Like humans, only with robots. He even tore the arm off one of the robots to see how it would adapt. Stunning.

The playlist gets better. Bill Washabaugh is sculptor leading a troupe of phenomenal people at Hypersonic. The NYC-based organization develops industrial installations of themed robotics, the result is a three-dimensional spectacle of awe and wonder.

Converge 2017 Event Report

Breaking Wave by Hypersonic is an example of Bill Washabaugh’s contribution to using technology in design

Greg Lynn of Greg Lynn FORM led us into a journey into the future that cannot be forgotten once seen, especially as it is already here. His design of valet robots trained to follow owners is expected to provide pedestrians greater functionality in populated areas. His vision is epic in scope and magnitude by the virtual simplicity of robots that follow you and carry your stuff for you. This development is soon to be literally at your heels in a short time to come.

Converge 2017 Event Report

Guests examining products made possible through the use of Altair’s numerous enterprise solutions

Michael Peng was next. In architectural circles, Peng is the master. Peng was the force behind Gensler’s construction of the 2,073 ft. Shanghai Tower. One of the many notable features of the tower is that its exterior skin twists 120 degrees around the building to shield it from typhoons. Peng took less than thirty minutes to explain how he did it.

Jason Lopes was the show finale. Lopes works for Carbon and he regaled the audience with stories of his days with Stan Winston and Legacy Effects studios. As their lead systems engineer, Lopes oversaw many notable products, and one of them was the construction of a 14-foot animatronic beast for San Diego’s Comic-Con. Operated by four men inside, this one-of-a-kind creation came to life in a record 30 days thanks to Lopes’ use of 3D-printing. The beast went on to wow the crowds for Jimmy Kimmel Live! show — and wowed us as well.

The event concluded with dinner and entertainment by Nick Waterhouse. For the fortunate creatives that were able to attend this uplifting affair, it will never be forgotten. For those that yearn for the keen gleanings of design’s Mt. Olympus, this is the place to be next year.

More on Converge, including how to register, is available at http://event.converge2017.com/.

The Daily 3D Detail: WESTEC 2017

Posted by Editor On September - 12 - 2017

Westec 2017

Just one of the fun things to see at WESTEC 2017

WESTEC 2017 opens today at the Los Angeles Convention Center (1201 South Figueroa Street, Los Angeles) with a wide assortment of booths and vendors all promoting the latest in industrial design. Billed as the west coast’s largest manufacturing trade show, WESTEC provides everyone from aerospace to robotics a chance to showcase their latest developments and innovations. A host of speakers will also be on hand for the three-day event to provide much-anticipated seminar sessions for attendees.

In addition to the keynote speeches by IBM and TITAN America MFG, there will be panel discussions on additive manufacturing and smart manufacturing. A smart manufacturing hub will be on display for businesses to tour, and a machining academy has been set up to help polish skills.

It’s Not Too Late to Register
Attendees can still register for free access to the WESTEC 2017 expo floor through a promo code available thanks to Polymer Molding on their Facebook page.

Key development made in 3D-printing copper

Researchers in Germany have made a breakthrough in the ability to laser melt copper. Image courtesy of Fraunhofer ILT.

The selective laser melting (SLM) method of 3D-printing is effective for most metals and many alloys, with the unusual exception for pure copper. While copper alloys have been used in the past, using SLM for copper has failed to the high degree of reflection affecting the laser attempts.

A new development being announced at the formnext 2017 trade show in Frankfurt, Germany by Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT has changed that outlook. The research project, funded by AiF German Federation of Industrial Research Associations, indicates that by using laser light in the green spectrum range, in the 515 nanometer wavelength, the absorptivity grows, thereby requiring less power needed to achieve consistent melting results.

Because pure copper is more electrically and thermally conductive than most metals and alloys, the need for pure copper parts is substantial and proves to a lucrative aspect of 3D-printing. But copper reflects up to 90% of laser radiation, so only a small amount of the energy is received by the material. Also machine components can be damaged by the reflected radiation, and when the copper transitions to a liquid state, it results in an unstable remelting process.

“We are hoping for a more homogeneous melt pool dynamics so that we can build components with high material density and achieve other positive effects, such as a higher detail resolution,” said Daniel Heussen, a Rapid Manufacturing group research fellow, of the new SLM approach.

Fraunhofer ILT is building its own green laser source as a result of the studies. The project is referred to as “SLM in green,” the goal of which is to produce a laser with an output of 400 watts in the green light wavelength (515 nm). If successful, devices will be able to 3D-print intricate objects in pure copper, which will be a boon for the construction of electrical components.

For more on the story, see Sarah Saunders’ article at 3DPrint.com.

The Daily 3D Detail: JPL searching for 3D printing interns

Posted by Editor On August - 30 - 2017

JPL searching for 3D printing interns

Opportunities now exist to be a part of JPL’s manufacturing team

Jet Propulsion Laboratories, located in Altadena, California, near Pasadena, is on the lookout for students interested in robotics and space exploration.

The posting on the job website Indeed.com is soliciting applications for work in their Mechanical Systems Engineering, Fabrication and Test Division. Duties include working with a team to develop mechanisms and mechanical systems; building prototypes to prove out mechanism design concepts; running tests to help inform design decisions; and analyzing test data to ensure that the team finds the most important results.

Applicants must be currently enrolled in full-time courses in a college or university pursuing a bachelors, masters, or PhD in mechanical engineering, aerospace engineering, chemistry, civil engineering, material/science, physics, robotics, structural engineering, operations research, or related technical discipline. Applicants must also have a 3.0 grade average to be considered.

Visit Indeed.com for instructions on applying.

The Daily 3D Detail: Condos on Mars

Posted by Editor On August - 29 - 2017

Condos on Mars

Artist vision of Mars habitat. Photo courtesy of dezeen.com.

Someday we’ll be living in space. At the rate of current of testing, Branch Technology and Foster + Partners may very well be the developer of your moon unit housing or Mars condo.

Condos on Mars

Members of Branch Technology’s NASA 3D Printed Habitat Challenge team

NASA’s efforts to produce sustainable housing off planet has concluded its competitive testing of third-party submissions. The top award of $250,000 was given to the combined efforts of the two research and development teams of Branch Technology, located in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Foster + Partners of California, for their efforts in producing a 3D-printed habitat. This challenge is the culmination of three levels of challenges in the Phase Two stage of NASA’s attempts to create “advance construction technology needed to create sustainable housing solutions for Earth and beyond.”

Condos on Mars

Competition for NASA’s 3D Printed Habitat Challenge was held at Caterpillar’s Edwards Demonstration and Learning Center in Peoria, Illinois

Referred to as NASA’s 3D Printed Habitat Challenge, the competition has elicited the efforts of five separate teams attempting to best each other in the ever-increasingly more difficult requests. Cash prizes have been given out to the top three contenders in each level of each phase. In the three levels of Phase Two, Branch Technology and Foster + Partners were in the top three of each event. They garnered top prize in level one, a challenge of printing a cone and a cylinder subject to endurance testing; third prize in level two involving the 3D-printing of a support beam (top prize went to South Korea’s Team Moon X); and now the top prize in 3D-printing a dome structure holding 3,726 pounds of ultimate load.

These challenges have brought space structures closer to a viable reality, admits NASA’s Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Technology Mission Directorate Jim Reuter. “The advancement and innovation in additive construction that we’ve seen from these teams is inspiring,” said Reuter. “Meeting the technology goals of this challenge proves that competition can push boundaries, and their work puts us that much closer to preparing the way for deep space exploration.”

Branch Technology and Foster + Partners also credited Techmer Polymer Modifiers for their work in material support.

For more on this story, see these articles at 3DPrint.com and 3DPrintingIndustry.com.

The Daily 3D Detail: 3D-printing giant LEGO blocks

Posted by Editor On August - 27 - 2017

3D-printing giant LEGO blocks

As many parents of young children understand, the commodities markets (gold, silver, pork bellies) shamefully neglect to catalog the ongoing rate of one of the world’s most collectible items: LEGO blocks.

3D-printing giant LEGO blocks

Image by Cmglee courtesy of Wikipedia

As LEGO blocks continue to hold their dollar value over time, the prospect of 3D-printing them grows. LEGO blocks are originally made of ABS (acrylonitrile butadiene styrene) and can be easily duplicated by most 3D printers. STL (stereolithography) files for LEGO block downloads have been around for years.

3D-printing giant LEGO blocks

Image of downloadable LEGOs by pokesummit

As the “world’s most powerful brand” LEGO has a strong tradition based on a singly mindful element of their product. It’s virtually impossible to replicate precisely. Even asian knock-off brands of LEGO blocks fail miserably across the board in terms of ease of use and reliability. And forget about having them work together with true LEGOs.

In terms of legal precedent in the LEGO trademark, a number of companies have been sued for infringing upon the LEGO design of their interlocking blocks. LEGO patented their definitive shape of the bricks with their inner tubes in 1958, but the latest European Court of Justice ruling in 2010, stated the eight-peg design of the original Lego brick “merely performs a technical function [and] cannot be registered as a trademark.”

3D-printing giant LEGO blocks

Knock-off companies like Wise Hawk are shameless in their marketing and produce inferior products

So printing one’s own blocks are likely to run into the same quality control issues that plague all other attempts at replicating LEGOs accurately. But printing them at five times the size? That’s a different animal altogether.

3D-printing giant LEGO blocks

3D-printing giant LEGO blocks

Mantis, a two-ton hexapod built by Matt Denton

Meet Matt Denton. Denton’s claim to fame is being the creator of the six-legged two-ton human-scale hexapod called Mantis. His latest contribution to the world is his giant-sized LEGO block creation, a five-times scale model of a LEGO go-cart, model no. 1972. Designed as a LEGO kit in 1985, this buggy cart with dual wheels and working rack-and-pinion steering took 168 hours to make — approximately seven days of printing. The end result weighed 5.1 kilos and cost a little over £100.

In his video series in two parts on the 3D printing of the blocks, Denton explains his tricks of the trade to replicate the LEGO creation in its massive size off a Lulzbot Taz 5 printer. Using extensive brimming to minimize warping at the edges, and foregoing support material in key spots were some of the techniques Denton employed. The video is extensive in construction detail, explaining which parts should be built in sections. No doubt this will not be the first of these mega-size LEGO creations, as anyone with a 3D printer can follow Denton’s lead through his step-by-step instructions.

It’s only a matter of time now until giant LEGO blocks becomes its own sub-Reddit thread. In the meantime, investing in LEGOs still proves to be a viable retirement plan for most parents.

The Daily 3D Detail: 3D-printed robot uses sign language

Posted by Editor On August - 23 - 2017

3D-printed robot hand uses sign language

Photos courtesy of Project Aslan

NewAtlas.com is reporting on the development of Project Aslan (ASL is the acronym for American Sign Language; ASLAN itself is the acronym of “Antwerp’s Sign Language Actuating Node”), a robotic device capable of interpreting spoken language into sign language for the benefit of deaf people.

Created by a team at the University of Antwerp in The Netherlands, in conjunction with 3D Hubs, Project Antwerp at this stage is a robotic hand that is able to sign letters and words spoken to it. Developers are attempting to create a full-body model to use both hands and an expressive face for its translation functions.

3D-printed robot hand uses sign language

This is not the first robot created to address sign language needs in society. Toshiba developed a signing robot in 2014 to help the elderly. Project Aslan is notable as much of the physical components are 3d-printed.

According to the story, the robot hand is made up of 25 plastic parts 3D-printed from an entry-level desktop printer, plus 16 servo motors, three motor controllers, an Arduino Due microcomputer and a few other electronic components. The plastic parts reportedly takes about 139 hours to print, while final assembly of the robot takes another 10.

Guy Fierens, Stijn Huys and Jasper Slaets are the three master’s degree students who began Project Aslan in 2014. Huys commented on the undertaking by saying, “I was talking to friends about the shortage of sign language interpreters in Belgium, especially in Flanders for the Flemish sign language. We wanted to do something about it. I also wanted to work on robotics for my masters, so we combined the two.”

For the full article, please see this page at NewAtlas.com.