There is Always Plan B

Posted by Editor On May - 11 - 20161 COMMENT

Plan B is an open source, composite-bound 3D printer you can rig together using regular ink cartridges and cyanoacrylate (superglue) solution

Plan B has been around for two years but it always remains an option for the garage printer enthusiast. Three Dimensional Printing (3DP) technology (powder bed and inkjet 3d printing) was first developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1993. Unlike the FDM printers (MakerBot and RepRap) that build objects by melting plastic, 3DP technology works just like a desktop printer. The process is similar to the Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) process, but instead of using a laser to sinter the material, an ink-jet printing head deposits a liquid binder, onto a layer of gypsum powder. Then a thin layer of powder is spread across the surface and the process repeats with each layer adhering to the last.

For the full story on how to build your own open source Plan B 3D printer, see: http://www.3ders.org/articles/20140821-plan-b-is-an-open-source-diy-powder-based-3d-printer.html

Top Five 3D Printing Trends

Jewelry design by Desmond Chan. For more on software that catches moving objects, see our story on Chronolab by Autodesk Researchers.

It seems like every week new 3D printers, 3D modeling apps and materials are getting announced. We are drowning in an information overflow about the newest model or filament on the market – and of course everyone has a different opinion about which trend will dominate the 3D printing market in 2016 and beyond. On crowd-funding platforms like Kickstarter or IndieGoGo more than 50 different 3D printing projects are currently being launched.

In order to find some structure in the chaos, we scanned the most important 3D printing blogs and journal articles about today’s 3D printing industry trends and compiled a list of what we think are the five topics most likely to shape the world of 3D printing from 2016 to 2020.

But before we start talking about the future, we also need to acknowledge how 3D printing is already changing our world. Car manufacturers use 3D printing to produce rare spare parts or prototypes for upcoming cars, airplane manufacturers like Airbus even use end parts printed in 3D. And of course 3D printing also heavily impacts the healthcare sector – in fact, most hearing aid devices are 3D printed and many implants already get printed in titanium.

What Will Happen with 3D Printing in the Next Few Years: Top Five Trends to Watch

The recent past has taught us that 3D printing works best when we talk about printing objects that need to be completely customized or unique (like implants, prototypes, or customized jewelry), or that would be too complicated to produce otherwise (3D printing is in fact great for complex designs with interlocking parts).

Based on numerous interviews with leaders and trendsetters in the 3D printing ecosystem, it is likely that we will soon see the following five 3D printing trends play a major role in the industry:

1. NEW 3D PRINTING MATERIALS:
Firstly, new 3D printing materials will emerge. Printing in metals is already a reality (titanium, steel, gold, you name it), but I think we will see more development using organic materials for printing skin and organs. Multi-material 3D printing will be another interesting trend to watch.

2. BETTER 3D PRINTERS:
Secondly, the machines will become more powerful: 3D printers will be able to print faster, better, and larger. Our latest addition, Smooth Detail Resin, is substantial proof of this point: its surfaces are smooth, its prints are very detailed (50 microns!), and the printing time is getting faster.

3. CHEAPER 3D PRINTING:
Thirdly, it’s quite likely that prices for 3D printing will come down even further. We’re simply talking economy of scale here. Sales of 3D printers (both for private and industrial use) will continue to boost and therefore prices will probably fall in the long run.

4.EASIER 3D MODELING:
This is still a major hurdle for many people. 3D modeling is not yet as easy and accessible as it should be. But I am hopeful that this will change soon. At the moment many 3D modeling programs simply ignore the 3D printing community.

They are designed for animators and graphic designers – and it can be really tough to make these models printable. But since an increasing amount of 3D designers create models with 3D printing in mind, more and more plugins and online apps that are easy to use are being developed. Even big companies like Windows or Photoshop are currently developing design solutions for 3D printing. This new competition will force established 3D modeling software programs to follow this trend.

5. NEW APPLICATIONS FOR 3D PRINTING:
Last but not least I want to talk about applications. In the next years we will see that 3D printers will be used for things that were far beyond our imagination in the past. In a short period of time we went from a pixelated Yoda figurine in plastic to cutting-edge high-precision metal printing. I think this trend will continue: what some people may see like a hobby for makers will change our lives in ways that we cannot even think of now. Only time will tell, but looking back at all that has happened over the last few years it’s pretty sure we can say: we will be surprised yet again!

So as you can see, the world of 3D printing is still far from reaching its full potential. Quite simply, there is still so much to be discovered and developed. The next years will probably bring even faster, high-quality 3D printing and new breath-taking materials. In all likelihood everyone will come into contact with a 3D printed object in the next years in one way or another – with or without actually knowing it.
This story reprinted from i.materialise.com, available at: https://i.materialise.com/blog/3d-printing-trends/.

Chronolab

Posted by Editor On May - 11 - 2016Comments Off on Chronolab

The software writers at Autodesk Research have brought Chronolab to the 3d printing industry. Introducing fluidity of motion into 3D printed frameworks. It bodes well for the artists and scientists interested in catching objects in motion. Features include speed lines, smoke, and the staging of motion in an array. Check out the video and see for yourself where technology invites innovation.

3D-Printed Superconducting Cavity Help Researchers Study Speed of Light

Posted by Editor On May - 9 - 2016Comments Off on 3D-Printed Superconducting Cavity Help Researchers Study Speed of Light

Studying the universe in depth requires the most expensive and complicated technology — or does it? 3D printing isn’t just developing at the speed of light, it can help study it, too.

Physicists at the University of Melbourne, led by Daniel Creedon, have been using superconducting microwave cavities. These cavities are a resonator for particle waves, that confines electromagnetic fields – usually microwaves are used. These “boxes” act similar to an organ pipe or sound box of a musical instrument.

The manufacturing process for such cavities is usually expensive and complicated. Creedon and his team, however, have designed and tested a 3D printed superconducting cavity for the first time.

For the full story, see: https://all3dp.com/researchers-develop-3d-printed-superconducting-cavity/.

Your Flexible Phone is Here

Posted by Editor On May - 9 - 2016Comments Off on Your Flexible Phone is Here

Device Enables New Scanning Cabilities

The Human Media Lab at Queen’s University announced the introduction of the flexible phone. Canada’s premier multidisciplinary media laboratories is the brainchild behind the Holoflex, capable of rendering 3D images with motion parallax and stereoscopy to multiple simultaneous users without head tracking or glasses.

HoloFlex features a 1920×1080 full high-definition Flexible Organic Light Emitting Diode (FOLED) touchscreen display. Images are rendered into 12-pixel wide circular blocks rendering the full view of the 3D object from a particular viewpoint. These pixel blocks project through a 3D printed flexible microlens array consisting of over 16,000 fisheye lenses. The resulting 160 x 104 resolution image allows users to inspect a 3D object from any angle simply by rotating the phone.

HoloFlex features a 1920×1080 full high-definition Flexible Organic Light Emitting Diode (FOLED) touchscreen display. Images are rendered into 12-pixel wide circular blocks rendering the full view of the 3D object from a particular viewpoint. These pixel blocks project through a 3D printed flexible microlens array consisting of over 16,000 fisheye lenses. The resulting 160 x 104 resolution image allows users to inspect a 3D object from any angle simply by rotating the phone.

For more on the Holoflex, see: http://www.hml.queensu.ca/blog/holoflex

White House Announces Week of Making for June 17-23

Posted by Editor On May - 9 - 2016Comments Off on White House Announces Week of Making for June 17-23

White House Announces Week of Making for June 17-23

President Barack Obama looks at Lindsay Lawlor’s 17-foot-tall, 2,200-lb robotic giraffe on the South Lawn of the White House during the first White House Maker Faire, June 18, 2014.

In June 2014, President Obama hosted the first-ever Maker Faire and launched the Nation of Makers initiative, an all-hands-on-deck call to make sure more students, entrepreneurs, and Americans of all backgrounds have access to a new class of technologies—such as 3D printers, laser cutters, and desktop machine tools—that are enabling more Americans to design, build, and manufacture just about anything. These new tools are helping reimagine “shop class” for the 21st century and giving students the types of hands-on STEM learning experiences that spark interest in science and technology careers. They are also fostering a “maker mindset”—dispositions and skills such as curiosity, collaborative problem-solving, and creative confidence that are vital to the modern innovation economy.

Building on that success, the Administration is announcing that it will celebrate a National Week of Making this June 17-23 alongside federal agencies and the broader community.

For the full story, see: https://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2016/03/09/announcing-june-17-23-week-making

Japanese Vagina Artist Found Guilty of Obscenity

A Japanese artist who made a kayak modeled on her vagina has been found guilty of breaking the country’s obscenity laws, in a case that has invited widespread ridicule of attitudes towards images of female genitalia.

Megumi Igarashi, who works under the pseudonym Rokudenashiko – or good-for-nothing girl – was arrested in July 2014 after she distributed data that enabled recipients to make 3D prints of her vagina.

Japanese Vagina Artist Found Guilty of Obscenity

The 44-year-old was fined 400,000 yen (£2,575), half the penalty demanded by prosecutors, at the Tokyo district court on Monday after she was convicted of distributing “obscene” images. She was cleared of another charge of displaying similar material.

For the full story, see http://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/may/09/japanese-vagina-kayak-artist-found-guilty-of-obscenity

Looking at Layer Design

Posted by Editor On May - 7 - 2016Comments Off on Looking at Layer Design

Benjamin Hubert of experience design agency Layer will launch the world’s first 3D-printed consumer wheelchair during Clerkenwell Design Week at Clerkenwell-London on May 24, 2016.

The GO wheelchair prototype is the first project under Layer’s new research division, LayerLAB, and has beencreated in collaboration with Materialise, world leaders in 3D-printed software and solutions. LayerLAB is a new inhouse division of Layer that facilitates experimentation and research into the future of physical and digital products.

Here is looking at Layer Design, industrial/interface designers: http://layerdesign.com

STL Files Today

Posted by Editor On May - 5 - 2016Comments Off on STL Files Today

All3d.com recently published the list of the 30 best websites and search engines to find free STL files. Thingiverse.com, the website run by Makerbot Industries, is the number one site by number of 3D model offerings, while Instructables.com is the number one site for number of visitors. For the full story and interactive table list, see: https://all3dp.com/best-sites-free-stl-files-3d-printing/

Websites
Thingiverse

Grabcad

Sketchfab

Autodesk 123d

CGTrader

My Mini Factory

Yeggi

Pinshape

YouMagine

Yobi3D

STL Finder

3DExport

Cults

Zortrax Library

New Matter

Rinkak

3DShook

Rascomras

Threeding

Repables

Libre3D

3Dagogo

Shapetizer

The Forge

Redpah

Trinpy

3D Warehouse

STLHive

NASA

Instuctables

Guy Makes a 3D Printed Concrete Castle

Posted by Editor On May - 5 - 2016Comments Off on Guy Makes a 3D Printed Concrete Castle

Reddit exploded last week over the posting of a man’s 3D printed concrete castle. Using the exciting new feature of 3D concrete formation, the man’s design of a castle makes 3D printing of architecture even more of a reality.

To visit the Reddit post, see: https://www.reddit.com/r/videos/comments/4g1k46/guy_makes_a_3d_concrete_printer_prints_castle/