Patent Awarded for Bone Implant Technology

Posted by Editor On May - 3 - 2016Comments Off on Patent Awarded for Bone Implant Technology

Patent Awarded for Bone Implant Technology

4WEB Medical, a manufacturer of 3D printed orthopedic implants, has been awarded a patent for their for truss implant technology by the US Patent and Trademark Office.

Over 10,000 truss implants have been implanted since 2013 throughout the USA, Europe and Australia. The patent, number 9,271,845 B2 and entitled ‘Programmable Implants and Methods of Using Programmable Implants to Repair Bone Structures’, is claimed to cover truss and strut-based lattice implant designs that transfer bone specific biologic strain to adjacent cellular material when loaded. It works on the concept that load causes strain, and therefore the implant will transfer stress to nearby cellular materials and stimulate osteogenesis.

Jessee Hunt, President and CEO of 4WEB, explained that they are pleased to have this patent issued as they believe it protects the design and stimulative nature of their programmable truss implants, furthering their quest to develop optimized, patient-specific implants that accelerate healing.

For more on the story, see: https://www.3dmednet.com/users/1034-alexandra-thompson/posts/6041-patent-awarded-for-bone-implant-technology

3D Printing at Sea

Posted by Editor On April - 29 - 2016Comments Off on 3D Printing at Sea

In its 18th annual report on additive manufacturing published last May, Wohlers Associates forecasted that we can expect the 3D printing industry to be worth $4 billion in 2015, and to reach $10.8 billion by 2021. According to Sculpteo.com, the maritime industry will be among those with the most to gain from 3D printing technology based on the structure of the industry.

Let’s take a closer look to examine the inner workings of this structure; the business of the industry is to export and import goods and services using the waterways as a means for transport; when shipping and naval vessels are travelling across the oceans and something breaks, the ability to immediately repair or manufacture spare items on site has a certain appeal. Today modern cargo ships are required to order and stock large numbers of spare parts and supplies to make sure that they are not caught short when needs arise out at sea. Imagine how 3D printing can change the way this process is managed?

To read more on this article including maritime 3D printing for military uses, see: http://www.sculpteo.com/blog/2015/10/12/3d-printing-maritime-military-vessels-cargo-shipping-and-more/.

3D Scanning Market Size to Exceed USD 6.05 Billion by 2022

Posted by Editor On April - 29 - 2016Comments Off on 3D Scanning Market Size to Exceed USD 6.05 Billion by 2022

European growth expectations in 3D scanner sales 2012 to 2022 seen above

3D scanning market size is projected to be valued at USD 6.05 billion by 2022, as per a new research report by Global Market Insights, Inc. Rising adoption of these systems in various industry sectors, namely, quality control, rapid prototyping as well as reverse engineering is expected to propel industry growth over the forecast period. Growing need to obtain precise and quick results with optimum efficiency is also expected to serve as a key driver.

Latin America 3D scanning market size was valued at over USD 250 million in 2014 and is estimated to grow at a CAGR of 13.9% from 2015 to 2022. Asia Pacific accounted for over 20% of the overall 3D scanning market share in 2014; growing demand can be attributed to technology proliferation across the region.

For more on the story, see: https://www.gminsights.com/pressrelease/3d-scanning-market-report.

Introducing Clotoo, France’s 3D Printer Company

Posted by Editor On April - 29 - 20161 COMMENT

Clotoo is claimed to be “a machine… Our networked machines allow for what we call production shared, i.e., the possibility for everyone to produce anything from everywhere. This requires a network of identical, autonomous, and reliable machines. This is why we have developed this innovative tool.”

Starting price is $6,000 une machine. Their website is impressive at: http://www.clotoo.com/machine.

Additive Manufacturing Users Group Elects New Board

Posted by Editor On April - 29 - 2016Comments Off on Additive Manufacturing Users Group Elects New Board

The Additive Manufacturing Users Group announced the election of its new board directed in the tasks of building the conference program for April 2017 and soliciting business involvement in the 3D manufacturing industry. Incoming president Steve Deak was a three-time president of 3DSUG, the predecessor to AMUG as the organization people look to in the 3D printing industry.

The 2016-17 AMUG Board members are:

* President: Steve Deak, GE Aviation
* Past President: Mark Barfoot, Hyphen
* Chairman, Gary Rabinovitz, Reebok
* Vice President: Dana McCallum, Carbon
* Vice President: Paul Pates, UL
* Deputy Vice President: Derek Ellis, Computer Aided Technology, Inc.
* Deputy Vice President: Mark Wynn, Yazaki North America
* Treasurer: Vince Anewenter, Milwaukee School of Engineering
* Event Manager: Tom Sorovetz, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles
* Secretary: Kim Killoran, Stratasys
* AM Industry Advisor: Todd Grimm, T. A. Grimm & Assocs.
* Advisor: Mark Abshire, Computer Aided Technology, Inc.

The incoming board also reappointed three AMUG global ambassadors:

· Ambassador: Graham Tromans, GP Tromans Associates
· Ambassador: Stefan Ritt, SLM Solutions
· Ambassador: Nora Cibula, Concept Laser

For more about joining AMUG, see: http://www.additivemanufacturingusersgroup.com.

NASA Successfully Tests First Full-Scale 3D Printed Rocket Engine

Posted by Editor On April - 29 - 2016Comments Off on NASA Successfully Tests First Full-Scale 3D Printed Rocket Engine

On April 21, 2016, NASA announced the successful testing of a 3D-printed fuel pump that may lay the first stone for the methane-fueled Mars lander.

Marshall’s Space Flight members at Huntsville, Alabama have been working with various vendors to 3D print rocket parts, and after a hard three years, things are happening. “This is one of the most complex rocket part NASA has ever tested with liquid methane, a propellant that would work well for fueling Mars landers and other spacecraft,” said Mary Beth Koelbl, the manager of the Propulsions Systems Department at NASA’s Marshall Centre. “Additive manufacturing, or 3D printing, made it possible to quickly design, build and test two turbopumps with identical designs that worked well with both liquid methane and liquid hydrogen propellant.”

For more on the story, visit: http://3dprintingindustry.com/2016/04/28/nasa-successfully-tested-worlds-first-full-3d-printed-scale-rocket-engine/.

Stryker Building 3D Printing Facility

Posted by Editor On April - 29 - 2016Comments Off on Stryker Building 3D Printing Facility

Stryker, the Kalamazoo, Mich.-based manufacturer of medical devices and equipment, is building a state-of-the-art 3D printing facility in 2016.

The facility will be a part of $400-450 million in capital expenditures that Stryker expects to make this year, the other major project being a standardization of the company’s enterprise resource planning software across its global operations. Stryker CEO Kevin Lobo mentioned the 3D project in passing during an investor’s conference call earlier this week.

Providers and suppliers have increasingly looked to 3D printing as a fast, inexpensive way to develop customized devices and better models to help medical students and surgeons visualize patient organs. Innovations in the field have included a ribcage for a patient in Spain and tracheal splints for four infants treated at the University of Michigan Health System.

Stryker has already been using 3D printing for a number of new products, including its knee system, said Bill Jellison, Stryker’s departing CFO. The company will also soon launch a 3D-printed titanium interbody device for the spine.

For more on the story, see: http://www.modernhealthcare.com/article/20160129/NEWS/160129849

Underwriters Laboratories Partners with EOS to Fine Tune 3D Printing Curricula

Posted by Editor On April - 27 - 2016Comments Off on Underwriters Laboratories Partners with EOS to Fine Tune 3D Printing Curricula

Underwriters Laboratories Partners with EOS to Fine Tune 3D Printing Curricula

UL (Underwriters Laboratories) is partnering with metals additive manufacturing (AM) supplier Electro Optical Systems (EOS) to provide AM training to EOS’s customers. The training will include some specific to EOS’s machines and technology, and some from UL’s own existing curriculum. Like UL’s training partnership with the Society of Plastics Engineers (SPE), this agreement will help promote correct usage of AM technologies by OEMs and others in manufacturing.

For more on this story, see http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1392&doc_id=280338&itc=dn_analysis_element&.

Researchers Create Mini-Bioreactors for Modeling ZIKV Exposure in Brain-Region-Specific Organoids

Posted by Editor On April - 27 - 2016Comments Off on Researchers Create Mini-Bioreactors for Modeling ZIKV Exposure in Brain-Region-Specific Organoids

Researchers Create 3D-Printed Brains to Study Zika Virus

Researchers at John Hopkins University have turned to the benefits of 3D printing to conduct studies on how the Zika virus (ZIKV) and microcephaly are related.

The article, published in Cell, the medical journal on cellular biology and biomedical science, details the necessity of creating 3D tissue cultures for better examining the effects the virus has on key areas of early brain development. By using tiny, spinning bioreactors, researchers were able to promote the growth of “mini-brains” from human stem cells, giving the scientists significant advancement over monolayer tissue development that fails to define endogenous biological systems such as early brain development.

The full report can be read at http://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674%2816%2930467-6.

Student 3D Prints Life-Saving Bottle for Preemies

Posted by Editor On April - 26 - 2016Comments Off on Student 3D Prints Life-Saving Bottle for Preemies

Student 3D Prints Life-Saving Bottle for Preemies

Ravid Koriat, a recent graduate of the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem, used personal inspiration for her final project in Industrial Design. A conversation with her sister-in-law about the challenges of nursing and pumping “mother’s milk” prompted Koriat to design a new style of feeding system, the FEEDER, specifically for newborns in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). To improve the system for breast milk collection, storage and delivery, Koriat developed accurate prototypes using Stratasys’ PolyJet multi-material 3D printing technology.

For more on the story, visit: http://blog.stratasys.com/2015/08/20/3d-printed-preemie-bottle/.